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Author: Michael Heron

My name is Michael James Heron, and I'm a lecturer at Robert Gordon University. This page serves as a container for all the various things with which I'm involved. My research interests are accessibility, games, and especially accessibility in games. As an academic with a strong interest in the Scottish Independence Referendum, I was also part of the team who developed RGU's twitter analysis tool. It may have been a 'no' in the end, but the fight goes on. I have taught for a decade in both further and higher education, and some of my teaching materials can be found at my wiki. I am also the owner, admin and lead developer of Epitaph: a text-based MMO set in the grim darkness of the zombie apocalypse. I am also the editor for Meeple Like Us, a board game blog with a strong focus on the accessibility of tabletop games. If you have any questions on that topic, feel free to ask them at my ask.fm page.. I occasionally blog too over on Gamasutra.
Inis review

Inis (2016)

I don’t really feel like I’ve given Inis the best possible crack of the whip. It’s been languishing on the ‘to review’ pile for a year and a half because I thought ‘I suspect this is a better game at higher player counts’, and I’d only managed to try it…

Mint Delivery (2018)

Given that I have already reviewed Mint Works and concluded ‘not for me’, it might seem like an act of machoism to take a look at Mint Delivery.   They came as part of a single Kickstarter reward though and I’d always intended to eventually get to it.  I intend to…

Isle of Trains Review

Isle of Trains (2014)

Every so often when running this site I sit down with a game about which I feel absolutely nothing.  No excitement.  No trepidation.   At most, a sense of weary resignation that a necessary responsibility is about to be competently discharged.   Sometimes I don’t even remember where the game came from…

Roll Player (2016)

If I’m being honest, the thing I enjoy the most in any RPG campaign is character creation. There’s something in the process that manages to convey all the excitement and potential of a campaign without any of the corresponding disappointment of actually putting your hero to the test. The attributes,…

Istanbul review

Istanbul (2014)

Playing Istanbul is a little bit like wresting a reluctant A* algorithm into grudging, malevolent obedience.   A lot of games are built on the idea of optimisation – that your goals are best served by ensuring the maximum yield for the minimum expenditure.  It’s a mechanism that is hard-wired into…