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Author: Michael Heron

My name is Michael James Heron, and I'm a lecturer at Robert Gordon University. This page serves as a container for all the various things with which I'm involved. My research interests are accessibility, games, and especially accessibility in games. As an academic with a strong interest in the Scottish Independence Referendum, I was also part of the team who developed RGU's twitter analysis tool. It may have been a 'no' in the end, but the fight goes on. I have taught for a decade in both further and higher education, and some of my teaching materials can be found at my wiki. I am also the owner, admin and lead developer of Epitaph: a text-based MMO set in the grim darkness of the zombie apocalypse. I am also the editor for Meeple Like Us, a board game blog with a strong focus on the accessibility of tabletop games. If you have any questions on that topic, feel free to ask them at my ask.fm page.. I occasionally blog too over on Gamasutra.
Decrypto review

Decrypto (2018)

It’s sometimes said that St James Park in London is so rife with spies meeting other spies that even the ducks around the Tin and Stone Bridge quack in code.    While that’s almost certainly not true unless everyone is working from a uniquely monosyllabic decryption table, it’s certainly something with…

Iota review

Iota (2012)

Iota comes in an absolutely tiny tin – a tin of the size you might more realistically expect to contain paracetamol or the large-print version of the positive case for Brexit.    Let me tell you though, pain-relief is exactly the entirely opposite frame of reference you need.  What’s inside is…

Scrabble review

Scrabble (1948)

The camera pans over a worn but well-maintained class-room.  Wood paneled walls draw the eye and upon these are hung various posters and swish infographics.  You can see the frequency chart for English on one wall, with a graph of the evolution of the Arabic lettering system hanging beside it. …

House rules and accessibility

The Accessibility of House Rules

Continuining our occasional series of posts about the AXSchat we conducted a few months ago I want to address another of the uniformly great questions asked during the Twitter chat that followed the interview.

Question five:  Being able to select a difficulty level is a well-known accessibility benefit of digital games. …