Flamme Rouge review

Category: Board Game Review

Flamme Rouge review

Flamme Rouge (2016)

If you ever wanted a game that combined the design ethos of Candyland with all the excitement of queueing while sitting atop a bicycle, then today is your lucky day.  We’re talking about Flamme Rouge.  It’s gets better than that too because you also get to mix the unbearable smugness…

Oh My Goods! (2015)

Modern society is built on the idea of successive chains of refinement.  Seeds are planted into soil, and then grow into wheat.  Wheat is farmed from fields, and refined into corn.   I think.  I don’t know, I don’t think I’ve ever stepped onto a farm in my life.  Corn becomes…

Terraforming Mars

Terraforming Mars (2016)

Stronghold publish some lovely, clever games but both this and Pit Crew are dramatically let down by boderline shoddy component quality.  I’m a big believer in the immersive power of good component design – that nice, satisfying pieces help us suspend disbelief.   Their job is twofold – it’s to serve…

Port Royal review

Port Royal (2014)

I mentioned in our Merchants and Marauders and Jamaica reviews that I cannot be relied upon to exercise due detachment from any game that is themed around pirates.  Pirates are awesome.  Not the real pirates of history of course – they were basically sea-borne terrorists.  The fictions of golden age…

Coloretto

Coloretto (2003)

It’s going to be tricky to talk about Coloretto because it’s hard to see where the conversation should go.  We can’t talk about the marriage of theme and mechanics because Coloretto basically doesn’t have a theme.  We can’t talk about complex interlocking game systems of fiendish cleverness.  Coloretto is, in…

Villainous (2018)

Villainous doesn’t feel like a game that should be dissected on a hobbyist website.  It’s a bit like being a structural engineer and complaining that the design of a Lego bridge doesn’t take into account the material science necessary for accurately modeled wind resistance.   It’s almost certainly true, but you…

High Society (1995)

When you strip an auction down to its rawest, most essential component what you’re left with is a room full of people engaged in a collaborative nervous breakdown.   The psychology at play in an auction is genuinely fascinating.  The stresses and tensions of the real-time nature of bidding can throw…

Modern Art

Modern Art (1992)

I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a game before where so much effort has been expended in making the package look so ugly.  There is so much misdirected energy here that it’s actually a little upsetting.   This is a game of modern art monstrosities and the people that are desperately…

Mafia de Cuba review

Mafia de Cuba (2015)

Bonasera!  Bonasera!  What have I ever done to make you treat me so disrespectfully?  If you’d come to this review in curiosity, then this game that ruined your friendships would be suffering to this very day.  And if by chance an honest reader like yourself should make enemies, they would…

Hand of the King (2016)

If there are unsung heroes of the Game of Thrones television team, it’s certainly the casting department. Lena Headey is amazing as Cersei. Jerome Flynn is magnificent as Bronn. Charles Dance is mesmerizing as Tywin Lannister. The casting team have taken the tremendous characters that are threaded through what is…

Fresco review

Fresco (2010)

One of the obvious things about a game is that it’s fundamentally an abstraction – something that stands to represent, but not precisely simulate, some other endeavour in some other realm of activity. Abstraction is an interesting concept because it is so malleable. Memoir 44 abstracts the Second World War…

Lotus (2016)

Lotus is a stunningly beautiful game with a cover that is so striking that I committed to buying it for its sheer aesthetic appeal long before I even knew what the game was.  It’s a friendly looking game.  It looks approachable.  Nothing about it is remotely intimidating.  When you look…

Tash-Kalar review

Tash-Kalar (2013)

A review copy of Tash-Kalar was provided by Czech Games Edition in exchange for a fair and honest review. It’s odd, at least on the surface, that a game so unabashedly abstract as Tash-Kalar should also be so profoundly evocative. It’s a testament really to the power of game mechanics…